Would You Please Say Something Nice?

After the announcement last week, and carrying on into today, I’ve gotten such nice messages from people, many I know, several I do not, saying the nicest things about me. It’s been pretty nice.  Really nice.  Wonderfully . . . you get the idea.

I wonder why we don’t always take the time to say nice things to other folks whenever we feel them, rather than waiting for a social cue like a big announcement or award or life event.

And then I saw this video, and realized that he said what I want to say pretty well:

It’s Thanksgiving Eve here in these United States.  Thanksgiving is certainly a time for being grateful and remembering to honor the people we are thankful for.  So would you do something for me this weekend?  Won’t take but five minutes, tops.  Take a second to think about someone for whom you are thankful, or proud of, or excited to know, and write them a short note, email, tweet, status update, or any other message, and let them know.  Be sincere, and be specific, but take the moment.

It’s so worth doing.  And so easy to forget to do.  Go ahead.  I’ll save this corn dog for you for when you get done.

Share

Champion of Change: Daddy & the #WHChamps

I’m still decompressing from the blur of the last several days and, in some ways, couple of weeks.  I’m now safely home from Washington, D.C., where I went with my best friend to be honored for my work by the White House.  And the President.  As I was processing the events of last Thursday with my wife, she and I realized that this was one of those experiences that will become family lore, that will be passed on by my daughters and, hopefully, grandchildren as “something that Daddy did.” So I thought it’d be a good idea to try to get some of my recollections down as a piece of my own family history.  That said, I suspect my recollections and reflections will trickle out over the next few weeks as I have some time to further process them.

Earlier this fall, a friend and colleague contacted me to let me know she had nominated me as a White House Champion of Change.  I provided her with some of my resume, per her request, so that she could complete her nomination, and then I promptly forgot about it, as I has suggested others to nominate, and I was certain that others would and should receive this recognition.  Then, in early November, I was contacted by the White House and asked to provide some contact information so that they could complete a standard security check.  At that point, I hasn’t received an award, I was just in the running.

It was a couple of weeks later when I was notified that I had been selected, and then things started to happen very quickly.  For a short moment, I considered whether or not it was worth it to bother traveling to Washington, D.C., to be honored.  I asked my wife if she would consider joining me, and by the end of the day, had booked a flight.  How many times does someone like me get to go to the White House?  There were photos to take, as the White House needed a good headshot for their website, and some additional writing to do, as they wanted to add a blog post from me to their collection of stories from other Champions.  And, of course, I needed a new suit.  My last suit was one I purchased several years ago, and, well, I’d lost fifty pounds since that suit was acquired.  It didn’t really do the job I needed it to do.  Many travel arrangements were made, and my mother graciously agreed to watch our children so that Tiffany and I could travel together to experience the award ceremony.  Quickly, things came together and we were off to Washington, D.C., and the White House.

On the day we flew to Washington, D.C., I made it to the gym for a run before the flight.  While I was running, I caught the footage of a special event – the awarding of the Presidential Medal of Freedom to several notable Americans.  Oprah Winfrey, President Bill Clinton, and Ben Bradlee were three of the award recipients who were honored in a ceremony in the East Room with President Obama.  I remember thinking that their accomplishments were pretty amazing, and I thought that perhaps I was be so lucky as to catch a glimpse of the President, but that he would be too busy to visit with us during our time.  We had been prepared that, although the President really liked to attend the Champions of Change events, that he was often too busy with the work of the day to stop by.

Thursday, November 21st, 2013

The day began with a trip to the White House for a public tour organized by the Office of Communications.  This was the standard public tour, available to anyone who obtained a pass from their Congressional office.1 But in this case, we didn’t have to go through any waiting period – we were basically moved to the front of the line.  Tiffany and I walked up to the White House and passed through several checkpoints.  Our IDs were taken.  And taken.  And taken.  A dog sniffed us for what I imagine was traces of explosives or weapons – we passed – and then we were inside the East Wing.  While we couldn’t take photos inside, both Tiffany and I did manage to check in via Foursquare and Facebook to document that we were, in fact, inside the White House.

As we walked the hallways and made our way into rooms with so much history, I realized that we had entered a large room that seemed familiar.  It struck me that I was in the same room I had watched the day before while running at my gym.  We were in the East Room, where the day before, I watched Steven Spielberg wave across to his friend Oprah as the Presidents looked on.  Whoa.  We soaked in as much as we could, asking questions and exploring places I had read about and seen on television, but was now standing inside.  We took our fill and emerged outside where it was once again safe to take pictures.  Here’s one:

IMG 1904

We then toured the grounds and took a few shots of the exterior that was so familiar.  I discovered later that this was the entrance used by many dignitaries who visited the White House.  To walk that same ground – wow.

IMG 1911IMG 1922

It was then time to return to the hotel to prepare for the ceremony.  As we made our way back, I took a quick scan of the President’s public schedule, something I’d begun doing once I knew when and where we would intersect with the Commander in Chief.  And there was a new entry on the day’s events at 2pm:

BZmtP ICYAAJtf1

The President would, indeed, be attending.  Deep breath.

We changed for the ceremony and headed to the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, or the EEOB as those in the know refer to it.2  After more security checks, we entered the labyrinth of checkered tiles that was the EEOB and headed for the auditorium where the event would take place.

Then we started waiting.  And waiting.  And waiting.  We were told there was a special surprise or two in store, and we began to be posed for a photo.  The photo, though, kept getting delayed.  Unbeknownst to us, the reason for the delay, I would find out later, was that the President, our “surprise” guest, was delayed because he needed to speak to the press regarding the Senate rules change that had just taken place.  But we were to delay for the President, because he really wanted to attend and visit with us.

No problem.  I didn’t mind waiting for the President.  Not one bit.  While we waited, our picture was taken with Gene Sperling.  And Valerie Jarrett came by to say hello.  And the nerves built up.  Lots of them.

Eventually, he did arrive, and we began.  The opening of the event looked like this:

When the President came on stage, the first thought in my head was that the fellow on stage really looked like the President – but it couldn’t actually BE him.  My brain had not yet processed that this was, in fact, the President.  Of course it was.  We were invited up to the stage to shake hands.  I did my best to remain calm, as you’ll see in the video.  But what you won’t see is that it took a great deal of work on my part to not jump the stage to shake his hand.  I’m pretty proud of myself that I waited patiently, so patiently, as my heart beat a hole in my chest.  I calmly, and firmly, shook the President’s hand and introduced myself.  I remember distinctly that it was a perfect handshake – good hand placement, and firm squeeze and appropriate amount of pump.  My father would have been so proud.

And then we moved into the rest of the event, with each of us taking a turn on stage in a panel conversation about education and technology.  For the next two hours, I was alternatively pinching myself about what I was experiencing while also wishing for a more substantive conversation.  That’s not a dig on the event, which was perfect, it was just my desire, in the middle of a group of educators who are on their game, to get into the weeds a bit and go deeper than surface level conversations about our work.  I took some notes about what I wish we had talked about, and a couple of points that I’ll expand upon in a future post.

At the end of the event, the crowd cleared pretty quickly.  I said hello to a couple of folks I knew who were in the room, and met a few more.  Then the auditorium was empty and it was time to leave.  With a deep breath, I stepped out of the EEOB, returned my visitor’s pass, and went through the gate.

The evening was a trip to the Lincoln Memorial.  We had promised Ani, my oldest daughter, that we would try to take a picture of it for her if we could.  And boy, did we.

IMG 4231IMG 4247IMG 4248

After the visit, we stepped into a gift shop or two to find the right souvenirs for our daughters.  Of course, the souvenir I want them most to remember and share is perhaps this one:

Daddy and the President and the Champions of Change

Or, better yet, this:

Mommy & Daddy at the White HouseThe perfect end to a magical experience was dinner after with Tiffany.  We enjoyed a great meal, but more important, time to talk through and decompress on the day that had just happened.  As I mentioned, I’m still processing and will share my thoughts here as I can compile them.

What an honor to represent all of my teachers and colleagues and the folks who helped me to become who I am at the White House.  I stood with the President not for what I have accomplished, but because of what they have done with and for and through me.  Thank you to all the folks who made this such an experience, and a special thank you to all of you who might read this who have been my teachers.  You did your jobs well, and I am forever better because of you.   I’ll have more to say about being grateful in another post, but know that I am, indeed, grateful.  I hope that my daughters have teachers like you to guide them and help them discover and chase after their dreams.

Many of the pictures I’ve shared here, as well as several more, are now online in a Flickr set, if you’ve an interest in seeing them.

  1. You can see much of what we saw here on the White House’s interactive tour website. []
  2. I wasn’t familiar with that location, but did remember the frequent references to the OEOB from the West Wing.  Turns out that the building was renamed by President George W. Bush.  Same place.  My inner TV geek was elated. []
Share

The #WHChamps Event Will Be Streamed

I’m writing this morning from Washington, D.C., where later today, they’ll be honoring the Connected Educator Champions for Change in a ceremony at the White House complex1.  

If you’d like to watch the event, they’ll be streaming it on the White House streaming site.  Please join us at 2pm Eastern, noon Mountain, today and learn along with me.  The hashtag the White House prefers, if you’re going to be tweeting along, is #WHChamps.  I’m not yet sure what my connectivity will be in the room, but you can bet that if I can get to an Internet connection during that time, I most certainly will.  

While you wait, head over to the Champions for Change website where you can learn more about the Connected Educator Champions for Change and what they’re up to in their work.

  1. The “complex” is code for “At the Eisenhower Executive Office Building next door.”  But I’m off for a White House tour this morning, so I’m certainly getting the full experience. []
Share

#WHChamps of Change

I don’t usually repost press releases here or on the blog or, well, anywhere else. But this time, I’m going to make an exception.

Screen Shot 2013 11 19 at 3 13 18 PM

I’m honored to represent all of my teachers, colleagues, and educator friends at the White House as I meet with the other honorees to discuss the challenges and opportunities of teaching in these exciting times. 

Here’s the rest of the release along with bios of the other honorees.

Smart folks.  I’ll be taking lots of notes.

Share

Partnerships

We’re reading Unmistakable Impact by Jim Knight together as a large team at work.  This is the second post in my series on that reading and reflection.  Here’s the first post.

I highlighted an awful lot of chapter two of this book.  The chapter is a focus on partnerships – the necessary criteria for successful ones, what they look like, and some of how to be a good partner.  It’s tricky stuff, building a true partnership, particularly when issues of power come along.  It’s hard to be equal when you’re in fear of your job status due to the other person in your partnership.

A few choice passages (Kindle locations in italics):

What is needed for choice to flourish is a structure that reconciles freedom and form. (863)

The solution is to create structures that provide focus for human experiences, while respecting the autonomy of each individual. (864)

When leaders choose to do the thinking for teachers — by creating scripts, pacing guides, and step-by-step procedures to be followed blindly — they engage in short-term thinking.  pacing guides and similar prescriptions may lead to a quick bump in test scores, but the long-term impact can be disastrous. (946)

Every act of dialogue is a hopeful act, a sign that we believe a better future is possible.  When I listen to you, and you listen to me, there is the hope that we can create something new and better, that we can advance thought, and, through dialogue, a better tomorrow. (1034)

People who live out the principle of reciprocity approach others with humility, expecting to learn from them.  When we look at everyone else as a teacher and a learner, regardless of their credentials or years of experience, we will be delightfully surprised by new ideas, concepts, strategies, and passions. (1070)

 

As I look back on these saved passages, I realize that what I’m taking away from this reading on partnerships isn’t how I want to build partnerships, but rather how I want to prepare myself for them.

The chapter speaks of partnering being a choice – it’s important to me that the people I work with, be it in a class or training or meeting or long-term teaching situation, are there by their own choice, and, if that can’t be the case, that they can shape the experience to their benefit through the exercise of meaningful choices.  This is messy.  Sometimes, this principle of choice means that someone I’d like to work with simply won’t want to.  That’s a loss for both of us, but I can’t force a situation to my liking and simultaneously honor the other person or persons involved.  Giving people choice means also allowing them to choose something other than you or the work you find important.  That’s essential to remember.

It’s also important to remember that the best we can do for ourselves to prepare for a partnership opportunity – and most interactions with others are opportunities – is to approach those others as honestly and openly as one can.  A simple question, addressed as a learning opportunity for all involved, can be an invitation to further learning.

I think partnership thinking should also impact how leaders handle conflict and change.  When a decision I’m involved in will impact someone, I can do my best to prepare them for that impact.  Better yet, I can seek their input before they are impacted as a way of working to mitigate or even prevent a negative impact.  That’s a way to create a possible partnership out of a potentially negative situation.  I hope my leaders approach situations as potential partnerships, opportunities to bridge division, rather than opportunities for creating distance.

I think of past partnerships where events that ultimately affected me were handled far beyond my control and awareness, for no good reason other than the comfort and convenience of the leaders involved.  As a district representative, I don’t want to take an easy way out or around a potential problem or sticky situation.  That doesn’t honor the humanity of the others involved.

So preparing for partnership is largely, for me, about preparing myself to be kind and open and curious.   And approaching others as if they’re the same.  Because most likely, they are.

When you think about partnerships, and preparing yourself as a possible partner, what do you think about?

Share

A 500-Year Flood (of Gratitude.)

It’s quit raining in Fort Collins at the moment, after three days of continual drizzle and sometimes pounding rain.  Last night, a patched hole in my roof began to drip a bit of water into the house.  That’s nothing.

The town where I work right now, though?  It’s cut in half by the river that’s blown its banks across the town.  Two other communities in the district where I serve are cut off from the rest of the world as all the roads that could get you in or out of there are no longer available for travel, or are simply gone.  And to the south, in Denver, more and more reports of flooding and evacuation.  They’re calling it, in Longmont, a 500-year flood event.

But it’s not raining here right now, and tomorrow my children will head to school, as they have a pretty normal day.

Across Twitter and Facebook and the eavesdropping police scanner app I promised that I wouldn’t download or turn on, I’m seeing/hearing/checking in on lots of folks who are having terrible evenings.  Homes flooded.  Families separated.  Water seeping into places water just doesn’t usually go.

And there’s pretty much nothing I can do tonight from my reasonably dry home not so far away from the communities and students and teachers I serve.  Save for listening and watching and cheering on the bus drivers and support staff and police, fire, and community leaders who are digging in and helping out as best they can.

Being helpless isn’t something I’m all that good at.

So let me say this, as I’m wringing my hands in helplessness and thinking of how to help down the line:  If you’re in the thick of it tonight, and bringing comfort, or blankets, or warm snacks to those without; if you’re driving a borrowed bus around the drowning streets of a Colorado town, taking families to safety, or reuniting them; if you’re coordinating shelters, or support, or just passing information along as a way of making sure it’s out there; if you’re helping right now; if you’re doing what you can,

well, then.

Thank you.

Share

Come to the Grand Opening of the Discovery Center for Make/Hack/Play

I’m excited to announce that we’ll be kicking off our programming and opening the doors of the Discovery Center for Make/Hack/Play at Spark! Discovery Preschool on Saturday, September 14th, from 10am to 2 pm here in Frederick, Colorado.  If you’re in the neighborhood, you should come make something and bring your family.  Admission is free – and there’s plenty to play with.

I’d love to see you there.  And I love that this idea is becoming a real place.  Now to build the community . . .

 

Screen Shot 2013 09 06 at 8 14 33 AMScreen Shot 2013 09 06 at 8 14 50 AM

Share

Oh, the Humanity

Professional learning that dehumanizes its participants carries the seeds of its own failure. When a select few do the thinking for others, when people are forced to comply with outside pressure with little or no input, when teachers asking genuine questions are labeled resistors, when leaders act without a true understanding of teachers’ day-to-day classroom experiences, those dehumanizing practices severely damage teacher morale. And when teachers feel disillusioned by the professional learning they experience, their disappointment, hurt, and unhappiness surface in the classroom and inevitably damage the very children they are there to educate and inspire. – Jim Knight, Unmistakable Impact, Kindle location 385

In the first chapter of the book that some of my colleagues and I are reading together, quoted above, Jim Knight lays out the idea that one of the core concepts for a truly great school is that we must build schools that are human, and that respect the humanity of the people serving them and served by them. A discussion question we’re talking about in our book group this week asks us to consider how we move closer to learning communities that empower teachers to online indian pharmacy embrace proven teaching methods. While I’m hesitant to take a stance, just this minute, on “proven teaching methods,” I feel like I want to advocate right now for a stance in a learning community, professional or otherwise, that focuses on the humanity of all involved.

A humane learning community takes time to explore ideas before rushing to move forward. This takes, well, time, but it’s time well spent. You can move fast, with shared purpose, when time has been taken to ensure purposeful conversation has been a part of the community building.

A humane learning community is one where questions are honored and taken at face value, where the presupposition of positive intent is absolute and intentional by all in community together.

And a humane learning community is one where learning is modeled by all in the community, especially the leadership.

These things are difficult to do, to take time to learn, or to honor questions, or to explore purpose together. Modeling learning, in my experience, seems most difficult. But they matter. And they carry messages, whether done or undone, that will impact the efficacy of the community.

I’m looking forward to being in conversation with my colleagues about this text. If you’ve read the book, I’d be curious to know what you thought of it.

Share

"What Apps Should I Buy?"

It sure seems like, whenever I tell someone what it is I do, that somebody wants to tell me about the tablet they just bought. Then I’m immediately asked this question:

“What apps should I buy?”

And I guess I understand why. Once you’ve got a piece of hardware, then certainly you need to put software on it. And there are plenty of “Top 100 Apps for X” posts out there, getting passed along and around like the candy that they really, in almost all cases, are not. It’s pretty easy to think that apps are everything.

But the advice I usually give goes something like this:

I really don’t have a clue about what apps you should put on your tablet, because I don’t know why you bought it. I don’t know what it is that you want the tablet to do. So let me ask you a question back: “What is it you want to get done with the thing?” Then we can have a conversation about what software to buy.

I’ve found there are two common scenarios when it comes to how people put apps on tablets. The first is the app junkie. Constantly on the lookout for the new stuff, they’ve downloaded dozens, and in many cases, hundreds of apps to their tablet devices. They might have spent time organizing them into folders or screens. And they don’t use any of those apps, but they sure do have a bunch of them. Their home screen is like the bookshelf in the house of someone who wants to impress you with his or her reading habits. Plenty of books. Few of them read.

The other common scenario I find is the one I want more people to embrace. This one involves folks who, when they realize they have a particular thing they want to get done, or a purpose in mind, approach their respective app store and search for apps that do the thing they’d like to do. They read reviews. They ask friends. And when they pull the trigger on an app or two, they poke at that app once they’ve installed it, seeking to see if it’s really the thing for them. They don’t have a ton of software, but what they have gets used.

You should be the second type of person.

Share