“Print” Sources in the 21st Century

2009 3962573662 card catalog

I was helping a teammate at the library today think through how to help a student. The student, a middle schooler, was doing a report on illness and needed some sources for their “research report.”

The student rejected my teammate’s help out of hand because the student needed a “print source,” and my teammate pointed the student to some of our online databases.

The thing is, those databases? They’re electronic versions of stuff that was originally on paper. And they offer full text. That one could print out. Back onto paper. If one wanted to. You know – because rules.

So, I ask again, several years since the last time I asked it:

What’s print? Why does that matter? Why are we still perpetuating the paper/digital false dichotomy of information?

 

Share

“A Way of Caring”

Two things from today that intersected in a useful way:

Early this morning, a teammate noticed another group at the library had a big pile of work on their hands.  She asked my permission to help them.  Because the person who used to sit in my seat at the library valued keeping teams separate.  Their work is their work.  Ours is different.  That was the old message.

My teammate’s desire, when she saw a need, was to help fill it.  She wanted to make sure I was okay with that.

Boy, was I.

I encouraged her to always help someone on our big team, the entire library team, when she saw somewhere she could contribute.1

Also earlier today, Zac wrote a bit about what it means to be someone’s teacher after they finish your class.  Here’s the important piece:

That’s a world I want to live in, and it’s what I want to model. I want my students to know I’ll be here. I want them to see that as a way of caring for those around them.

As I grow into my new role as a manager of the work of others, that’s what I want, too – not to direct too much, or dictatorially, but to be someone who walks a walk that suggests that it matters more that we’re helpful, kind and considerate, rather than we’re the best team of the teams.

I don’t much care how many email hacks you know, or what browser extensions you’ve mastered, so long as you’re trying every day to be a kind and compassionate person.

Tech is simple compared to that.

Today, I started an email migration project, moving from one platform to another.  It’s going pretty well. But the work I’m proudest of this week is when my teammate knew that I’d be okay with helping, and that I’d give her permission to care.

 

  1. Her heart already pulled her there.  It’s too bad a former supervisor interfered with that inclination. []
Share

A Library Is Somewhere You Can Take Things Home to Explore

Earlier today, I enjoyed reading Barry Joseph’s piece at DML about a digital pen that’s changing the experience at one metro museum.  But what really struck me was how he framed the difference between a museum and a library, and what that framing said about what a library is.  In talking about his experience, he wrote:

As I walked through the exhibit, I found that I was experiencing a museum in a totally new way. When I visit a museum, I am often collecting information or inspiration. I know I won’t remember the details, but the feeling will linger in my bones. But now, with the Pen, the museum has also turned into a library or sorts. I am collecting information and inspiration I can explore later, at home. 

You should read the whole piece, but think with me here for a minute:  Is what makes a library a library is that you can take stuff away, if at least for a little while?  Is the definition of a library a place where you can collect “information and inspiration (you) can explore later, at home”?

I like that idea very much.

Share

Nerd vs. Geek

We’re starting to revamp some of our technology help here at the library.  And we are expanding our maker-y programming, too.  To move us forward in both areas, we’re going to launch a nightly “Ask a _____” booth, where our technical team will be on the floor to demo things they’re experimenting with, as well as help people with drop in computer, ereader, and other technical assistance.  We’ll be leaning into and demonstrating our learning in a public way at the library.

But we’re having trouble with the name.  We want to own our passion for learning and exploring technology – and to label ourselves in a way that says we are really, really into the thoughtful application of this stuff.

So, does that make us nerds, geeks, or something else?  When you come to the library would you rather:

  1. Ask a nerd
  2. Ask a geek
  3. Ask a _______ (but what’s the something else?)

Inquiring minds want to know.  We launch the new program pretty much as soon as we know what to call it1.

  1. There’ll even be a Lucy-esque booth.  With a can for nickels, of course. []
Share